Articles worth reading: Getting Online after 25 years in prison

Posted: July 7, 2014 by Prison Entrepreneurship Program (PEP) in Articles on Incarceration and Recidivism
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Each week, we read a number of prison and recidivism articles from various online resources. Here are our top picks from what we’ve read recently.

Let us know what you think about each of these articles! Please comment below or contact us via Facebook or Twitter.

Once a criminal, always a criminal?
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/once-a-criminal-always-a-criminal/

This article points out that there is a higher recidivism rate among non-violent criminals. This is a rate we can do something about if we re-think the prison system.

What It’s Like to Get Online After 25 Years in Prison
http://mashable.com/2013/03/14/michael-santos-prison-online/

Once inmates serve their time, are they prepared to survive in the world? Are we setting them up for failure? For some inmates, major changes have taken place in the world while they’ve been incarcerated. We can lower the recidivism rate if we can rethink the prison system, and give inmates life changing tools and skills.

The prison door keeps revolving
http://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/2014/05/04/mass-incarceration-worth-our-low-crime-rates/5E1ypAZw2MalhR4KfmHZpJ/story.html

Plainly, there is something deeply disquieting about a democratic superpower locking up so many people that 25 percent of the world’s reported prisoners are housed in US cells. How can a country with an incarceration rate of 716 inmates per 100,000 residents, roughly five times the global average, think of itself as “The Land of the Free?”

What do you think? We’d love your feedback.

How can we can change these statistics?

Comments
  1. greg46107 says:

    Reblogged this on true freedom ministries and commented:
    “As a prisoner, I could not access the web directly. Staff members oversaw policies that placed enormous barriers between the people inside boundaries and society. In the prisons where I served my sentence, prisoners were even prohibited from accessing electronic typewriters.”

    Read the whole thing.

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