Posts Tagged ‘in the news’

nacogdoches rotary

Brad C. and two PEP volunteers, Sherry P. and Carl. P, with a leader of the Rotary Club of Nacogdoches

The PEP Revolution rolls on … into Nacogdoches, Texas!

The local Rotary Club invited one of our graduates and two of our volunteers to share their story with the member of the club. Pictured here are the presenters, who spoke to over 100 people in an event that was later broadcast on television through KTRE (click here for the video).

(To learn more about Sherry’s son Kevin, read his guest blog here or watch his video here)

We are so very grateful for the many people who join us in our effort to transform the prison system.

 

Please take a moment to watch the video below … and then share it!



Nacogdoches couple touts prison entrepreneurship program that changed son's life
.

Steven Hausman triumph commercial

Steven Hausman, PEP Dallas Advisory Board memebr

One of our graduates’ favorite parts of the PEP program is the Integrity Selling component of our six-month Business Plan Competition.

This program was developed — and continues to be taught! — by the dynamic duo of David Rains (President and Founder of Commercial Finance Consultants, the leading recruiting and consulting firm for executive and senior management for the Factoring, Asset Based Lending and Trade Finance Industries) and Steven Hausman (President and CEO of Advance Business Capital and President of Triumph Commercial Finance LLC).

Steven was recently interviewed about his work with PEP by Andrew Rudin at Customer Think, a global online community of business leaders striving to create profitable customer-centric enterprises.

You can read the article here, or a portion of it below:

Unique Entrepreneurship Program Helps People Move Past the Hard Cell

Andy Rudin: In mentoring inmates for selling skills, what is the greatest challenge you have encountered?

Steven Hausman: So much to share and so little time. Given the logistical constraints, we lay out the foundation and challenge the men to apply these principles through practice.

Andy Rudin: On leaving prison, many former inmates must re-enter society carrying labels that are stigmatized. When they start businesses, what are the biggest selling challenges they typically encounter?

Steven Hausman: To be honest, I don’t know—but I can speculate. Every small business and/or start-up has more than a load of selling challenges. These guys have all those plus another full measure associated with their pasts. But, they’ve also been tested by a fire that’s hotter than most of us ever experience. I don’t bet against any of these men.

Andy Rudin: From this program, which outcome or achievement has been most personally satisfying for you?

Steven Hausman: Simply convincing them that selling is a not just an occupation but a life skill. Also, encouraging these men that effective sales communication has nothing to do with manipulation, but rather we honor people by presenting ourselves in a manner that the other person can receive.

Andy Rudin: Over the course of training inmates for effective selling, what have you learned that surprised you the most?

Steven Hausman: Not to judge any books by their cover.

Andy Rudin: In your program, you provide participants the opportunity to test their skills and role play. How do you coach individuals when they struggle? Are there situations in which you find a person “just won’t make it in sales”?

Steven Hausman: Again, we’re not trying to develop salespeople as much as impart basic selling skills that we believe can benefit everybody. So, no—each and every one of them can make it. Do they struggle at times? You bet. There’s always a fine line between criticism and encouragement. It’s like any message—best delivered in truth and love.

Andy Rudin: Top sales achievers are often characterized as patient and empathetic, and able to be highly persuasive verbally. But some of the people you work with have had a violent past, and may not have grown up nurturing these skills. How do you help inmates re-channel difficult behaviors when they are in selling situations?

Steven Hausman: It’s an issue we try to tackle head on in our very brief discussion of negotiations. By the time we see these men, their personal transformations are already manifest. Because of the incredible work that PEP has already completed, it’s no longer a “heart” issue—it’s all about life skills.

Andy Rudin: In 2007, Americans spent $49 billion on incarcerating people, which averages to an annual expense of $21K per inmate. In sales, we’re passionate about “making the business case.” What do you see as the greatest economic benefits of the Prison Entrepreneurship Program?

Steven Hausman: Easy question. PEP works. Incarceration is costly indeed, but it’s the exponential costs of recidivism that are broken. On a personal level, I’m in love with the real, substantive life change which PEP produces. The economic return on this investment makes the value proposition undeniable.

You might be wondering why this matters. After all, jail is jail, right? We need this program and others like it because few can argue that as a society, some of what we spend to incarcerate people could be invested more productively. Instead of paying over $21,000per person per year to incarcerate 2.3 million people, what if we re-purposed some of that money toward education to help some of them become fulfilled, taxpaying citizens?

“Most PEP participants were either dope dealers or violent criminals and many were in raised in disadvantaged situations where education and achievement were not modeled.”With a national prison recidivism rate above 60%, “we need to rethink prison as punishment and begin to utilize it as a place to the end the wicked cycle of crime and addiction.” PEP graduates have a recidivism rate of less than 5%. You do the math. The financial return that comes from every invested dollar provides enormous benefits to society, and a future for those who would otherwise struggle to find a pathway toward a better, more fulfilling life.

BBC Prison Entrepreneurship Program

Between graduating our largest class ever, preparing for the launch of Class 20 and closing in on the goal of our $100,000 challenge … we somehow forgot to share the great news that PEP was profiled in the BBC!

Your support of the Prison Entrepreneurship Program is doing much more than changing lives here in Texas. You are building a solution to one of the world’s most baffling problems — how to transform the futures of incarcerated individuals. And thankfully, the world is beginning to notice the impact of your belief in our mission!

You can read the article here: “Turning Prisoners into Entrepreneurs”:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-22839903

Please share it with others!