Posts Tagged ‘Integrity Selling’

Steven Hausman triumph commercial

Steven Hausman, PEP Dallas Advisory Board memebr

One of our graduates’ favorite parts of the PEP program is the Integrity Selling component of our six-month Business Plan Competition.

This program was developed — and continues to be taught! — by the dynamic duo of David Rains (President and Founder of Commercial Finance Consultants, the leading recruiting and consulting firm for executive and senior management for the Factoring, Asset Based Lending and Trade Finance Industries) and Steven Hausman (President and CEO of Advance Business Capital and President of Triumph Commercial Finance LLC).

Steven was recently interviewed about his work with PEP by Andrew Rudin at Customer Think, a global online community of business leaders striving to create profitable customer-centric enterprises.

You can read the article here, or a portion of it below:

Unique Entrepreneurship Program Helps People Move Past the Hard Cell

Andy Rudin: In mentoring inmates for selling skills, what is the greatest challenge you have encountered?

Steven Hausman: So much to share and so little time. Given the logistical constraints, we lay out the foundation and challenge the men to apply these principles through practice.

Andy Rudin: On leaving prison, many former inmates must re-enter society carrying labels that are stigmatized. When they start businesses, what are the biggest selling challenges they typically encounter?

Steven Hausman: To be honest, I don’t know—but I can speculate. Every small business and/or start-up has more than a load of selling challenges. These guys have all those plus another full measure associated with their pasts. But, they’ve also been tested by a fire that’s hotter than most of us ever experience. I don’t bet against any of these men.

Andy Rudin: From this program, which outcome or achievement has been most personally satisfying for you?

Steven Hausman: Simply convincing them that selling is a not just an occupation but a life skill. Also, encouraging these men that effective sales communication has nothing to do with manipulation, but rather we honor people by presenting ourselves in a manner that the other person can receive.

Andy Rudin: Over the course of training inmates for effective selling, what have you learned that surprised you the most?

Steven Hausman: Not to judge any books by their cover.

Andy Rudin: In your program, you provide participants the opportunity to test their skills and role play. How do you coach individuals when they struggle? Are there situations in which you find a person “just won’t make it in sales”?

Steven Hausman: Again, we’re not trying to develop salespeople as much as impart basic selling skills that we believe can benefit everybody. So, no—each and every one of them can make it. Do they struggle at times? You bet. There’s always a fine line between criticism and encouragement. It’s like any message—best delivered in truth and love.

Andy Rudin: Top sales achievers are often characterized as patient and empathetic, and able to be highly persuasive verbally. But some of the people you work with have had a violent past, and may not have grown up nurturing these skills. How do you help inmates re-channel difficult behaviors when they are in selling situations?

Steven Hausman: It’s an issue we try to tackle head on in our very brief discussion of negotiations. By the time we see these men, their personal transformations are already manifest. Because of the incredible work that PEP has already completed, it’s no longer a “heart” issue—it’s all about life skills.

Andy Rudin: In 2007, Americans spent $49 billion on incarcerating people, which averages to an annual expense of $21K per inmate. In sales, we’re passionate about “making the business case.” What do you see as the greatest economic benefits of the Prison Entrepreneurship Program?

Steven Hausman: Easy question. PEP works. Incarceration is costly indeed, but it’s the exponential costs of recidivism that are broken. On a personal level, I’m in love with the real, substantive life change which PEP produces. The economic return on this investment makes the value proposition undeniable.

You might be wondering why this matters. After all, jail is jail, right? We need this program and others like it because few can argue that as a society, some of what we spend to incarcerate people could be invested more productively. Instead of paying over $21,000per person per year to incarcerate 2.3 million people, what if we re-purposed some of that money toward education to help some of them become fulfilled, taxpaying citizens?

“Most PEP participants were either dope dealers or violent criminals and many were in raised in disadvantaged situations where education and achievement were not modeled.”With a national prison recidivism rate above 60%, “we need to rethink prison as punishment and begin to utilize it as a place to the end the wicked cycle of crime and addiction.” PEP graduates have a recidivism rate of less than 5%. You do the math. The financial return that comes from every invested dollar provides enormous benefits to society, and a future for those who would otherwise struggle to find a pathway toward a better, more fulfilling life.

The college textbook PEP uses in prison

The college textbook PEP uses in prison

With two major BPC events on Friday and Saturday, this is a really big week in prison for Class 19!

This afternoon, our CEO Bert Smith will cover another new chapter in “Entrepreneurship: A Small Business Approach.” This week, we discuss Chapter 14: Franchising and Purchasing an Existing Business. This is one of the final lessons that our participants receive on their path towards securing a Certificate in Entrepreneurship from Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business.

On Friday, over 60 executives have registered to attend the “Selling with Purpose” event where our participants will pitch them one-on-one in “mock selling” presentations. The executives get to set the scene for the role-playing (i.e. “we are sitting next to each other at a little league game, and our kids are on different sides of the ball.”), and then our participants have 10 minutes to begin a conversation that leads to them either closing the deal or booking an appointment for a follow-up.

See photos from last class’s Selling with Purpose event at http://prisonentrepreneurshipprogram.zenfolio.com/c18selling

The very next morning, our participants return for Business Plan Workshop … and they will be greeted by one of our largest crowds EVER for such an event — over 70 executives! The participants and executives will share valuable one-on-one time, during which the participants share the feedback that they have received on their presentations/business plans so that the executives can help them to improve their pitches. This is all aimed towards strengthening the initial presentations that our participants will make at their May 17 “Pitch Day” event.

See photos from last class’s Business Plan Workshop at http://prisonentrepreneurshipprogram.zenfolio.com/c18bpworkshop

All of this preparation culminates on June 6 and 7, when PEP launches its 19th Business Plan Competition in prison.

Learn more about these events here.

See you in prison!

Class 18 Selling Night

A photo from last class’s “Selling with Purpose” event. Click to see more.

Later this month, Class 19 will have its “Selling with Purpose” event on Friday, April 19 from 11:30 – 5:00 pm. This event gives our participants the opportunity to present their Business Plan to our executive volunteers as potential business contacts. This fast-paced event involves volunteers hearing one-on-one “sales pitches” in a speed-dating format. Volunteers then grade the presenters so that they can strengthen their approach over the final months of the program, all in preparation for the ultimate test before graduation.

The very next day – Saturday, April 20 from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm – the guys return to the PEP Classroom for our Business Plan Workshop. During this event, they will get their hands dirty on improving their pitches and their plans while working one-on-one with executive volunteers to respond to the written and oral feedback the participants received on their business plans the prior day. These back-to-back events combine to make good business plans even better!

(Register to attend either event here.)

In preparation for these events, the guys on the unit are getting ready for an intense “Integrity Selling” class this Friday. The class is taught by long-time volunteers (and members of PEP’s Dallas Advisory Board) Steve Hausman and David Rains, as well as other executives who will be joining them. These tremendous volunteers help our participants not only learn how to hone their salesmanship skills, but how to cultivate relationships with customers that stand on a firm foundation of personal integrity. Our goal is not just to make our participants better salesmen … but better MEN overall.