Posts Tagged ‘pep business plan advisors’

It's time to get down!

It’s time to get down!

This Friday, January 24, 2014 we will welcome our newest participants into the PEP family! The event serves as the official launch of Class “Triumphant” 21 in the Prison Entrepreneurship Program. This class begins our march towards the next thousand lives that we will transform with your support.

(We celebrated our 1,000th graduate this past December when Class “Tenacious” 20 earned their diplomas)

During this week’s event, we will share inspiring stories of success from our executive volunteers and past PEP graduates. One-on-one time will also allow you to meet our new recruits! The event runs from 11:30 until 5:00pm, and we would love to have you join us. See schedule to RSVP here.

Can’t visit us in prison? No problem! You can still support Class 21 by volunteering as a BUSINESS PLAN ADVISOR. That’s right … you can volunteer by email! Our staff will send you one email per week with a business plan that is being developed by one of of our participants. You will read it, edit it and provide feedback. Most critically, you will also provide market research for our participants (who lack Internet access while in prison).

The entire volunteer project can be done anonymously, if you would like. This is a wonderful opportunity to invest an hour per week in a program that will truly transform lives. Please learn more and register here.

The University of Houston’s newspaper, “The Daily Cougar,” recently ran an article about the university’s students involvement in PEP. You can see the article online here, but it is also included below.

Students in the Wolff Center for Entrepreneurship in the C.T. Bauer College of Business have been volunteering for years at the Prison Entrepreneurship Program, an entrepreneurial extension of the Texas Prison System, which has graduated more 800 inmates.

Through the Business Plan Advisor Program, MBA students volunteer to teach inmates how to write business plans and pursue their own entrepreneurial ventures.

“This is a remote volunteer program through which MBA students can receive business plans being developed by incarcerated participants in our program,” said Jeremy Gregg, the chief development officer at PEP. “The students provide feedback on the plans and help with market research.”

This outreach program at the Wolff Center is recognized for impacting and transforming the lives of inmates and volunteers.

Al Massey, UH alumnus and executive relations manager for the Prison Entrepreneurship Program, is an example for both volunteers and inmates.

While he was in prison serving a six-year sentence for intoxication manslaughter, he was recruited to participate in the program. After graduating, he stayed on as a peer educator until he was granted parole and released in May 2010. Shortly after, he began working at PEP and has demonstrated how people can be remembered for their positive actions.

Character Assessment

“We can all make mistakes when we take risks, and in my first 55 years of life I never thought I would be incarcerated,” Massey said. “PEP changed my character and made me the person that God meant for me to be by making me look at my faults.”

Any student Bauer who is interested in serving the community while gaining both teaching and entrepreneurship experience can look into the opportunity to volunteer through the Wolff Center.

“By being a business plan advisor or by volunteering in other areas with this program, students can help these men realize they are significant,” Massey said. “We cannot be the world to everyone, but we can be the world to one person. By volunteering, students can touch someone’s life and be the world to that person.”